Friday, February 15, 2019

WORKING ACROSS GENRE with KATE CAYLEY


TUES MARCH 12
7.30p.m., LINC classroom, 4th floor, Central Branch, Hamilton Public Library       
Kate Cayley’s first collection of short fiction, How You Were Born, won the Trillium Book Award and was a finalist for the Governor General’s Award. She has published two collections of poetry, When This World Comes to an End, and Other Houses. She has also written a young adult novel, The Hangman in the Mirror, which won the Geoffrey Bilson Award for Historical Fiction. She was a playwright-in-residence at Tarragon Theatre in Toronto from 2009-2017, and wrote two plays for Tarragon, After Akhmatova and The Bakelite Masterpiece, which had its American premiere in 2016 and a third production at the New Repertory Theatre in Boston this past spring. She is a frequent writing collaborator with immersive theatre company Zuppa Theatre, most recently on The Archive of Missing Things and This Is Nowhere. She is the writer in residence at McMaster University for the 2018-19 academic year, and is working on a novel and a second collection of short stories. She lives in Toronto with her wife and their three children.

Sunday, January 13, 2019

HOW TO WRITE A CHILDREN’S STORY AND GET PUBLISHED WHILE PROCRASTINATING

TUES FEB 12, 7.30p.m. LITCHAT is CANCELLED DUE TO WEATHER, LIBRARY IS CLOSED.
LINC classroom, 4th floor, Central Branch, Hamilton Public Library

JENNIFER MOOK-SANG grew up in Guyana, South America and now lives Burlington Ontario. While reading bedtime stories to her two sons, she fell in love with picture books and decided to write one of her own. In the midst of her writing journey, Jennifer is amazed and delighted to find herself a published author. Her humorous middle-grade novel Speechless (2015, Scholastic) was nominated for a slew of awards. It was named the Surrey  Schools Book of the Year and commended as a ‘best book of the year’ by the CBC. Jennifer’s picture book Captain Monty Takes the Plunge was published by Kids Can Press in October 2017. Captain Monty is a stinky pirate who’s never had a bath, because he’s afraid of the water, because he can’t swim. Of course he falls in love with a mermaid. What could be more perfect? Jennifer loves to read and cook (and eat) and talk to her many young readers about writing. The actual writing part? Not so much. She will share her story of becoming a real live writer and her road to publication. Questions welcome!


Thursday, December 13, 2018

COUNTRY NOIR: BRAD SMITH in CONVERSATION with GRAHAM ROCKINGHAM



TUES JAN 8 2019
7.30p.m.-9p.m.
LINC classroom, 4th floor, Central Branch, Hamilton Public Library

BRAD SMITH was born and raised in the hamlet of Canfield, in southern Ontario, a couple of hours from Toronto. After high school, he worked for the signal department of the Canadian National Railway for three years, and then got a chance to work on a rail project in South Africa. Upon returning from Africa, Smith worked all over the place - Alberta, British Columbia, Texas - at a variety of jobs. Farmer, signalman, insulator, truck driver, bartender, schoolteacher , maintenance mechanic, roofer, and so on. He became a carpenter and built custom homes in Canada. He still works as a carpenter when not writing. He now lives in an eighty-year-old farmhouse near the north shore of Lake Erie.

Novels:
RISES A MORAL MAN – 1990 – Penumbra Press
ONE-EYED JACKS – 2000 – Doubleday Canada
ALL HAT – 2003 – Penguin Canada
BUSTED FLUSH – 2005 – Penguin Canada
BIG MAN COMING DOWN THE ROAD – 2007 – Penguin Canada
RED MEANS RUN – 2012 – Simon & Schuster Canada
CROW’S LANDING – 2013 – Simon & Schuster Canada
SHOOT THE DOG – 2014 – Simon & Schuster Canada
ROUGH JUSTICE – 2016 – Severn House
HEARTS OF STONE – 2017 - Severn House
THE RETURN OF KID COOPER – 2018 – Skyhorse New York 
Screenplays:
ALL HAT – premier Toronto International Film Festival 2007
FADING FAST – Bravo TV 2009

Sunday, November 18, 2018

OUR STORIES IN DECEMBER

TUES DEC 11
7.30p.m.-9.00p.m.
LINC classroom, 4th floor, Central Branch, Hamilton Public Library.
Everyone is invited to bring and share a story for this December evening.

Tuesday, October 9, 2018

DIVIDED with LINDA FRANK


TUES NOV 13
7.30-9.00p.m., LINC classroom, Central Branch, Hamilton Public Library

Linda Frank's fourth book of poetry, published by Wolsak & Wynn this spring, is called Divided. Her work has been widely published in literary journals and anthologies. She has been short listed for the Pat Lowther Award and won the Bliss Carman Award.

Linda will discuss research and poetry. How do you research when writing a poem? Can facts be lyrical? Are facts truth in poetry? Can poetry tell the truth without fact?


Saturday, September 15, 2018

PAUL LISSON on Anniversaries: HAL magazine, 10th Year / Short Works Prize, 5th Year

TUES OCT 9
7.30p.m.-9.00p.m.
4th floor, LINC classroom, Central Branch, Hamilton Public Library
Paul Lisson was born in the north end of Hamilton into a family of union card carrying steel workers who played in bagpipe bands.
Poet and archivist. Winner: Hamilton Art Award for Visual Art and Writing (1997); and for Arts Administration (2017). Winner: McMaster University Rand Memorial Prize for Accomplishment in Print. Paul was, for many years, the Librarian in the Programming Department at the Hamilton Public Library and organized hundreds of concerts, exhibitions, and talks. Co-founder with Fiona Kinsella and Peter Stevens (1963-2015) of Hamilton Arts & Letters magazine. Co-founder of the Short Works Prize for Hamilton writers.

Paul’s first full-length book of poems, The Perfect Archive, will be published by Guernica Editions in 2019.

Monday, August 6, 2018

HOMEWORK: LOCALISM IN AND AGAINST THE SPACE OF FLOWS

TUES SEPT 11
7.30-9.00p.m.
LINC classroom, 4th floor, Central Branch, Hamilton Public Library

Innis spent a lot of time wondering “Why do we attend to what we attend to?” Our attention is increasingly divided between the space of places and what Manuel Castells calls the space of flows, the apparently fluid and encyclopedic space beyond our screens.  We will consider a few works of fiction in which this city is depicted, and also some of the blogs which have arisen in the space of flows to direct attention to the city’s places. Is the space of places freer than the space of flows? Citizens living under censorious regimes sometimes resort to “inner emigration.” Does it make any sense to think about defecting from the global aggregation of attention in the space of flows to dwell only in the space of places?

Shawn Selway is a Stelco-trained millwright and the author of “Nobody Here Will Harm You”, a book about the evacuation of Inuit from the Eastern Arctic to the Hamilton Mountain Sanatorium during the sixties. His writing has appeared in a variety of journals and on the local civic affairs blog, ”Raise the Hammer”. He is currently an active member of the Hamilton Tenants Solidarity Network. Don't agonize, organize.